Neighborhoods

Allston-Brighton

Anchored from the east by Boston University and on the west by Boston College lies the Allston/Brighton neighborhood. Widely noted for its college population, this stretch of Boston remains one of the more affordable areas and a preferred spot for foodies and hipsters due to the influx of popular restaurants, second hand stores, tattoo parlors, dive bars and, of course, music venues (earning the nickname “Allston Rock City”). Other notable landmarks in the area include St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Agganis Arena and Harvard Stadium. It's rumored you may find the members of Aerosmith kicking around outside their old apartment at 1325…

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Back Bay

Known as “the jewel” of Boston’s residential neighborhoods, Back Bay is conveniently situated near many of Boston’s acclaimed offerings, including Fenway Park, Boston Common and the Public Gardens, Prudential Center and Copley Place and the Boston Public Library. You can spend your afternoons browsing couture on Newbury Street or taking a scenic bike ride along the Charles River’s Esplanade. Back Bay is another walker's haven, but commuters will find the Green Line, Orange Line and commuter rail options originating at Back Bay Station and car access along Storrow Drive. Real Estate in Back Bay Back Bay offers contemporary city living…

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Bay Village

Bay Village is nestled on the southern end of Back Bay to the east of the South End. As the smallest Boston neighborhood comprised of only 12 streets and roughly 900 residents, there’s no denying its charm with ubiquitous shade trees and gas lamps lining the streets. It lays claim to fame as Edgar Allen Poe's birthplace. Even tiny Bay Village manages to offer up a couple of dining gems, notably Mike & Patty’s and Erbaluce, along with the abundance of dining and nightlife in the adjacent Back Bay and South End neighborhoods and beyond. Arguably one of the easiest…

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Beacon Hill

Beacon Hill is rich in history as well as notable antique and boutique shopping and many charming cafés. Its own shining beacon is The Massachusetts State House with its 23-carat gold clad domed roof erected in 1798 on the original site of John Hancock’s farmhouse. With a short walk to the Charles River’s Esplanade and the Boston Common and Public Gardens at its feet, Beacon Hill offers residents easy access to some of the City’s most beautiful public outdoor spaces. Beacon Hill is supremely walkable, accessible by the Green Line and offers a wealth of commuting options north and south…

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Boston

Boston: A City of Neighborhoods As the largest city in New England, Boston is most notable for its rich historic heritage and deep investment in the arts with world class museums and theatres, even boasting its own symphony orchestra and ballet company. Set on scenic Boston Harbor and ringed by the Olmstead-designed Emerald Necklace park system, there are broad and diverse opportunities for outdoor pursuits as well. Hosting some of the world’s finest hospitals and academic institutions brings an international and multicultural flavor to its midst. Additionally, Boston is long on entertainment with a myriad of choices for live music,…

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Brookline

Established in 1705, Brookline is a suburb of Boston, surrounding it like a horseshoe. It is a unique mixture of bustling streets made up of upscale shops and village pubs and rolling countryside with gracious apartment buildings, large estates and home to legions of academic and scientific professionals working at the nearby medical centers in neighboring Boston and Cambridge. Architectural styles include brownstones reminiscent of Boston’s Back Bay, Queen Anne, Colonial and Medieval. It’s most notable structure may be the iconic art deco Coolidge Corner Theatre. Numerous notable places include President John F. Kennedy’s birthplace in Coolidge Corner, Allendale Farm,…

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Brookline Hills/South Brookline

Brookline Hills/South Brookline is considered quaint, retaining much of the old-school Brookline flavor and small neighborhood essence. Situated along the western edge, Brookline’s premiere areas, the Fisher Hill District and Fisher Hill Estates, are recognized on the National Register of Historical Places. Many of the homes are prestigious and quite large, housing many area notables. Brookline High School is located in Brookline Hills. Public transportation is serviced by the D branch of the green line. Driving is surprisingly easy with access to Route 9 and 128 and main roads connecting popular neighborhoods such as Jamaica Plain and West Roxbury. Real…

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Brookline Village

Brookline Village has a small community feel amplified by the local small eateries, restaurants and shopping. It is also home to most of Brookline’s civic institutions including the public library, town hall and is located in the Pierce School district of Brookline Public Schools. Parks are large and plentiful including Parson’s Field which hosts Northeastern University’s sports programs, Emerson Gardens is a popular children’s destination and the Brookline Ave. Playground doubles as a spacious off-leash dog park! Public transportation is available via the D line branch of the MBTA Green line with commuters availing themselves of Route 9 which becomes…

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Cambridge

Cambridge sits across the Charles River from Boston, offering a multicultural setting where residents and visitors from around the world mingle in the shadow of two of the world's premier educational institutions: Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Beyond higher learning, Cambridge has long been an industrial innovator, producing America’s first factories for ladders, piano keys and waterproof hats. Originally established by founders of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630, the original street plan of their settlement survives almost intact in Harvard Square. The buildings span four centuries, the most famous, along "Tory Row" on Brattle Street,…

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Central Square

To the east of Harvard, Central Square has the honor of being named the official Cultural District in 2012 by the Mass Cultural Council and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It's actually most notable for the wide variety of startups ranging from technology to internet to pharmaceutical enterprises. The City of Cambridge offers financial incentives causing multitudes of young professionals and attendees of Harvard or MIT flock to the area. The vibrant neighborhood is easy to navigate with plenty of live music and theaters featuring spots like The Middle East Restaurant and Nightclub which attracts national…

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Charlestown

With a great location near Boston Harbor and a landscape reminiscent of Beacon Hill, Charlestown’s streets are paved in cobblestone, lit by gas lanterns and boast several of the City’s most historic sites. Paul Revere frequented the local Warren Tavern and started his famous midnight ride here and the Bunker Hill Monument, where colonial troops were warned not to fire until they saw the whites of British eyes. Charlestown is also home to the historic Boston Navy Yard where USS Constitution, the world's oldest commissioned warship still afloat, and the museum ship, USS Cassin Young are both docked. Residents enjoy no…

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Chinatown

Offering a mix of far-east culture in a vintage Boston setting, Chinatown is tucked behind the City’s Theatre District and Midtown and beloved by Bostonians and tourists alike. Its entrance is marked by the foo lion on the traditional gate seen from Lincoln St. and encompasses the section of the Rose Kennedy Greenway housing public art installations. Chinatown showcases its heritage with an abundance of authentic restaurants and several events and parades including Chinese New Year celebrations and the Oak Street Fair featuring vendors & merchants from the Far East. Public transportation includes easy access to the Orange Line and…

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Cleveland Circle

Cleveland Circle straddles the border of Brookline and Boston which only becomes important when observing the overnight parking ban for Brookline. Here’s a little secret clue: if you look at the street signs, it’s green in Boston, white in Brookline. Also notable is the non-permit parking options on one side of each Sutherland and Strathmore Roads for those who may have out of state license plates. There is a large Boston College student and faculty population in Cleveland Circle due to its proximity to the main campus. A popular outdoor destination for runners and dog walkers is the Chestnut Hill…

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Coolidge Corner

Coolidge Corner is what many would describe as the epicenter of Brookline, demarcated by the intersection of Beacon and Harvard Streets. Here you will also find two of Brookline's most iconic landmarks, the art deco Coolidge Corner Theatre and the S.S. Pierce building, a finely-crafted tudor office building once housing a general store owned by the Coolidge brothers. Coolidge Corner is also home to several other notable places including the birthplace of JFK (on Beals Street) and other area favorites such as the Brookline Booksmith. Both the Booksmith and Theatre are nationally-recognized independent establishments featuring local and national artists and…

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Dorchester

Dorchester, the southeastern most neighborhood of Boston, is easily the largest and one of the most affordable. The neighborhood is considered a micro melting pot due to diversity of the many city squares, each with its own cultural influences. Dorchester is bordered to the west by Franklin Park, considered the "crown jewel" of the famed Emerald Necklace, featuring an 18-hole golf course and a zoo. To the south and east lie UMass Boston and the JFK Presidential Library. Dorchester boasts great access to public transportation with 5 stops along the MBTA Red line and a well developed commuting infrastructure with…

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East Boston

Located across the Harbor, residents of East Boston enjoy breathtaking views of the Boston skyline and waterfront. With a history of welcoming immigrants, this up-and-coming neighborhood is rich in culture and diversity and in the process of restoring many of its historic sites. Home to Logan International Airport, this neighborhood is also a gateway for people from around the world and a short commute via the Callahan tunnel or Blue Line assures a timely arrival downtown. Real Estate in East Boston Thanks to the Boston Redevelopment Authority, which has invested heavily into the neighborhood, new residential housing and community amenity…

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East Cambridge

Once a sleepy, middle class neighborhood, East Cambridge has become a highly desirable neighborhood. Streets in the neighborhoods are laid out in a grid offering easy connections to the Charles River and Harvard Square. The Museum of Science rests on the very eastern edge of the neighborhood and is an incredible cultural resource for kids, adults and tourists alike. Old candy and candle factories made way for loft-style residences and modern developments such as the Cambridgeside Galleria and hotel complexes along the river. Lechmere, the end of the inbound MBTA Green line is here along with very easy access to…

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Financial District

Formerly serving primarily as a business center, the completion of the Big Dig transformed the Financial District into an instantly popular residential neighborhood. The 15-acre Rose Kennedy Greenway and popular Haymarket outdoor food market anchor this bustling in-town neighborhood. On the southeastern edge lies Faneuil Hall Marketplace extremely popular with tourists and locals alike featuring street performers and a number of food and retail options. Also nearby is the new Boston Public Market and Boston’s famous Haymarket Square showcasing the best produce you can find in the City and open year ‘round. The Financial District is conveniently located a short…

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Fort Point

Fort Point is nestled on the southern edge of Boston's Waterfront between the Fort Point Channel and the Seaport District and was known for its role as a defensive system in colonial times. What was once strictly commercial waterfront is now a diverse arts community, becoming a hotspot for many of Boston’s up and coming restaurants, hip venues, and home to several emerging tech companies. Fort Point incorporates the site of the infamous Boston Tea Party and home to Boston’s Children’s Museum and the future home to Martin’s Park scheduled to open in 2018. Boston Fire Museum is located on…

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Harvard Square

Harvard Square is the very heart and soul of Cambridge so it’s no surprise that Harvard Square is one of the most popular communities in all of Massachusetts to visit. Its rich with history and culture (celebrity sighting are not uncommon) and an abundance of ways to occupy your time. The main attractions are the Harvard University campus located on the northern edge of the Square and Harvard Yard, where many indulge the age old tradition of rubbing the foot of John Harvard's statue (for good luck). Other long standing institutions such as the Brattle Theater, Institute of Contemporary Art…

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Hyde Park

As Boston's southernmost neighborhood, Hyde Park's unmatched community spirit is on display in the many small shops and restaurants along Hyde Park Avenue, River Street and Fairmount Avenue that make up the Cleary and Logan Square business districts. The historic Neponset River runs through this neighborhood and in the spring and summer, many city residents flock to the George Wright Golf Course and 475-acre Stony Brook Reservations. Downtown is only a bus or commuter train ride away via the Fairmont or Providence Commuter Rail Lines. Real Estate in Hyde Park Hyde Park is home to an increasingly diverse population who…

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Jamaica Plain

Just three miles from downtown and more than 1,200 acres of parkland, Jamaica Plain is the perfect spot for those seeking urban living in a suburban atmosphere. JP, as it’s known to locals, has long been home to a large artist community and progressive residents attracted to the community’s culturally diverse population. Boasting the most open green space in the City, JP is home to 3 parks of the famed Emerald Necklace; Jamaica Pond, a glacial kettle pond, the Arnold Arboretum, the 297-acre tree and shrub sanctuary and Franklin Park, considered the “jewel” of the necklace as the largest of…

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Kendall Square

Known as Cambridge's technology hub, Kendall Square is home the main campus of the renowned Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), feeding the largest cluster of tech startup office space in Boston area, including such recognizable names such as Microsoft, Genzyme and HubSpot. Cooperative works spaces such as WeWork are also prevalent here. Many residents subscribe to the progressive work/live attitude and many businesses offer campus-style work environments. The population is young and vibrant with no shortage of dining, shopping and nightlife catering to their wants. It’s very common to find residents walking the tree-lined streets and enjoying the bike path…

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Kenmore Square / Fenway

Kenmore Square and Fenway is a dense urban neighborhood set against a backdrop of appealing open, green spaces, including the Fens and the Fenway Victory Gardens, celebrated as the oldest in the nation. The area is beloved by sports fans as home to iconic Fenway Park, the oldest Ballpark in America, housing the Major League Baseball team, World Champion Boston Red Sox. Many of Boston's finest cultural institutions beckon the arts minded with the Museum of Fine Arts, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the Massachusetts Historical Society all within walking distance of one another. The Fenway also boasts several universities,…

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Leather District

Located just south of Chinatown, the Leather District is a small neighborhood comprised of mostly brick, multi-level buildings primarily built for textile, leather or fur merchants. Many boutique indie coffee shops and eateries inhabit this small patch of Boston. South Station, Boston’s largest transportation hub, is located on the southern edge of the Leather District. Numerous options include Amtrak, multiple bus lines and the MBTA Red line. Access to Mass Pike and I-93 is right in the neighborhood and, as a little secret, the airport HOV lane is located right off Lincoln St. slipping you into Logan Airport in under…

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Longwood

Located in Norfolk County, Longwood is most notable for its teaching hospitals, particularly, Harvard Medical School. And, it’s also one of the most desirable places to live in and around the historic town of Boston, Massachusetts. The Longwood Medical Area, also simply called Longwood, is home to such institutions as the Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, the Wentworth Institute of Technology, and many more. Longwood is serviced by it's own stop on the MBTA Green branch which offers the medical community quick access to the Longwood Medical Area. Real Estate in…

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Midtown

Nestled between Chinatown and Downtown Crossing, Midtown has experienced a renaissance, evolving into a new and exciting residential neighborhood. Midtown’s proximity to the Theater District and the restored Boston Opera House makes indulging in an evening of the arts effortless. Dining hot spots, nightclubs, and lounges make it a popular destination for enjoying the Boston nightlife. Residents can enjoy strolling through the 15-acre Rose Kennedy Greenway or historic Boston Common and Public Gardens. Yet, when Monday rolls around, it’s just a quick commute to the professional hub in the Financial District and Government Center. Midtown is a great neighborhood for those…

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Mission Hill

Mission Hill is most notable for being popular with Northeastern University and Longwood Medical students and faculty. The neighborhood enjoys a diverse group of residents with about 50% of those being between the ages of 18 and 25 years old. In Mission Hill’s center, Brigham Circle, you’ll find the hub of Boston's world renowned medical and medical research/education centers, Children's Hospital, Beth Israel/Deaconess, Brigham & Women's and Harvard's Medical School alongside several groceries, pharmacies, restaurants & bars and banks. Several public parks are in and around Mission Hill including Kevin W. Fitzgerald Park offering great views towards downtown. Mission Hill’s…

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North Cambridge

North Cambridge is bordered on three sides by Arlington, Somerville and Belmont. This neighborhood has undergone major redevelopments in the very recent past giving rise to many new and luxury high rise apartment buildings with more on the horizon. Locals enjoy the Linear Path connecting North Cambridge with Davis Square. Other area amenities including the Fresh Pond Mall, Russell Field and the Francis J. McCrehan Memorial Swimming and Wading Pool and proximity to the dining and nightlife in nearby hipster haven, Somerville. Public transportation is services by the Red Line Alewife MBTA stop, connecting the end of the outbound service…

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North End/Waterfront

Known as Boston’s Little Italy, the North End is the city’s oldest residential neighborhood. Curving streets contribute to an intimate European feel, while dozens of restaurants, cafés, bakeries, specialty food markets and family-operated butchers give the North End its distinctive ambiance. Home to Paul Revere’s house, the Old North Church (where the lanterns were hung to signify the arrival of the British by land or sea) and the colonial burial grounds, the neighborhood is steeped in local history. Living in this tight-knit community is especially exciting during the summer months when the streets fill with visitors to the vibrant festivals…

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Porter Square

North of Harvard Square lies Porter Square, renamed for the former Porter’s Hotel's famous cut of beef, the porterhouse. The shopping district offers residents one-stop shopping for groceries, pharmacy and several eateries. Lesley University occupies much of the long-standing commercial space. Porter Square serves as a hub for commuters and residents alike with the MBTA red line servicing the neighborhood at the bottom of its infamous 199-step stairway and notable 46-foot aluminum kinetic sculpture installation on site. Real Estate in Porter Square Housing consists of mostly multi-family housing lining the side streets and neighboring Somerville to the east. The Agassiz…

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Roslindale

Once considered a "garden suburb" of Boston, today's residents of Roslindale are still attracted to the neighborhood's natural beauty. Expect to know your neighbors and their dogs as locals walk and bike in the Arnold Arboretum, the 265-acre oasis that is part of Frederick Law Olmsted's Emerald Necklace. Roslindale Village, centered around Adams Park is the city's original Main Street district and now one of the most vibrant, featuring several bistros, unique shops and hosting a number of annual events showcasing the neighborhood. Public transportation is abundant via MBTA Orange Line and Commuter Rail, linking the area directly to Downtown with…

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Seaport District

The Seaport District, once on track to fall into obscurity, is now one of the hottest neighborhoods in the City. Thanks to investments by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, the community is attracting many affluent young professionals who love the area’s burgeoning restaurant scene and globally renowned attractions, with new additions constantly being introduced. As in much of the City, the contemporary scene blends seamlessly with vintage spots such as the Boston Fish Pier, home to the No-Name Restaurant, a legendary mainstay for some of the freshest seafood in Boston. The MBTA Silver line services the Seaport area but public transportation…

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Somerville

Somerville is an eclectic mix of blue-collar families, young professionals, college students and proudly embraces recent immigrants from countries as diverse as El Salvador, Haiti, and Brazil. Somerville celebrates its neighborhoods and its diversity with several ceremonies marking cultural traditions and holidays throughout the year. The City is defined by its city squares, such as Ball Square, Teele Square, and Magoun Square. Each feature bustling businesses and entertainment centers and a mix of ethnic restaurants, bars and shopping. In 2014, the City opened its latest center of art and industry: Assembly Row, a beautiful urban environment along the Mystic River…

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South Boston

South Boston, commonly referred to as “Southie” was once a predominant Irish community and has since evolved into one of the most desirable neighborhoods in the Boston area. Located to the southeast of Fort Point and Seaport, it’s one of the only areas of  Boston with a beach (Carson Beach). The main thoroughfare is along Broadway, lined with brownstones and streetlamps and a great mix of new and iconic restaurants and small businesses. South Boston is proudly home to the nationally-acclaimed, annual St. Patrick’s Day parade which brings in as many as 1,000,000 visitors into the neighborhood. Public transportation is…

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South End

Considered one of Boston’s liveliest and most culturally diverse neighborhoods, the South End is the largest surviving Victorian residential district and dotted with community gardens and pocket parks. The South End is home to the Boston Symphony Orchestra, a myriad of jazz clubs, and an eclectic array of eateries. The neighborhood’s SOWA district (South of Washington Street) is home to galleries, artist’s studios, and lofts – where residents take part in the lively arts scene on “First Friday,” a monthly art walk hosted by the SOWA Artist Guild. Public Transportation includes Orange Line and commuter rail access at Back Bay…

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Theatre District

It’s curious the Theatre District developed at all considering the Puritans banned plays until the late 18th century. Nevertheless in 1793, the first theater opened and the number of small venues quickly ballooned. By the turn of the century, there were 31 theaters in the district, featuring some 50,000 seats, growing to more than 50 venues at its peak in the 1940s. Today, its home to 10 major theatres including the Shubert Theatre, Wang, Boston Opera House, Charles Playhouse, Cutler Majestic Theatre, Colonial Theatre, Modern Theatre, Orpheum Theatre, Paramount Theatre, and Wilbur Theatre showcasing a variety of works from on…

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Washington Square

Just west of Coolidge Corner lies Washington Square, demarcated by the iconic clock at the intersection of Beacon and Washington Streets. On the south side of Washington Square, streets wind incongruously with pedestrians accessing Beacon Street by walking paths. Local lore has it they were cattle paths back in the day. Washington Square includes what many laud as Brookline’s best dining (with outdoor seating!) and nightlife, including the ever-popular Publik House. Driscoll School services this area. Public transportation is along the C line stops on the MBTA’s Green Line. Real Estate in Washington Square Housing includes many brownstone building along…

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West End/North Station

Located on the western edge of downtown bordering Beacon Hill to the south and the North End to the east, the West End is best known as home to the World Champion Boston Celtics and Boston Bruins, delighting basketball and hockey fanatics at the TD Banknorth Garden. It is also a bustling entertainment district, enjoying a great swell in its micro economy due to the numerous restaurants and bars servicing the area around the Garden. Massachusetts General Hospital, a nationwide premier medical facility, anchors the West End and serves as the economic backbone of the neighborhood, as well as proximity…

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West Roxbury

West Roxbury is located in Boston's southwest corner and home to a 19th century experimental, utopian community frequented by such notable writers as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau. Today, West Roxbury is known for its civic activism and youth programming. Centre Street anchors the neighborhood's business district, which consists of diverse bistros, restaurants, banks, and shopping. The neighborhood is flanked to the west by the 100-acre Millennium Park offering miles of trails and a canoe launch for the Charles River and to the east by the 475-acre Stony Brook Reservation offering twelve miles of hiking trails…

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